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Running Plans for California

Posted by on Feb 16, 2012 | 20 Comments

California is one of the premier trail running destinations in the world.  Shelly and I are going to try to pack as much running as we can in the roughly two months we have in the state.  Here are the runs we’re planing or considering:

  1. Group run with the Movin Shoes “Mountain Monthly” trail running group for a few hours out on the Pacific Coast Trail this Sunday (Feb. 19th).  We’ll meet at the La Mesa store at 8am, then carpool to the trail.  Anyone is welcome to join us… it’s a great opportunity to let Shelly and I bore you for a few hours out on beautiful trails!
  2. Cactus to Clouds climb up Mt. San Jacinto near Palm Springs, CA.  (early April)
  3. Run up Mt. Whitney near Lone Pine, CA (early April)
  4. Run the two Western States canyons- Deadwood and El Dorado  (mid-March)
  5. American River 50 training run, March 17th starting in Auburn, CA.  This one is still tentative, Shelly and I (and Krista, Pablo, Shacky, and Vanessa) are running the Rodeo Valley 50k the next day.

That’s all we have right now.  Any suggestions?   The criteria:

  • The greater the elevation gain the better,
  • The more technical trails the better,
  • The greater the scenery the better.

Also, check out the new Merrell Bareform video we did this last fall:

Additional note-the Barefoot Runners Society has moved to: http://thebarefootrunners.org/.  Update all those bookmarks and links!

 

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20 Comments

  1. Erik
    February 18, 2012

    Nice video! Even if it is about shoes. I would try to smile a bit more though :)

    • Jason
      February 18, 2012

      They edited out the goofy smiles. :-)

      • Erik
        February 18, 2012

        Editing done by someone else is seldom satisfying, but you come off a little worried or over-concerned when explaining things. Not trying to be pissy here, but it might be something you could work on in the future. You might think about adopting a more subtle version of Tom Cruise’s cocky jock persona, if it doesn’t make you feel too uncomfortable :(

        • Jason
          February 18, 2012

          I’m more of a “Broadway” actor than “Hollywood.” :-)

          Or maybe “Off-Broadway.”

          Okay- “understudy to the supporting role in the local community theater.”

  2. Dave
    February 17, 2012

    From the video:
    “your feet are gonna land directly under your center of gravity”

    This is completely false as it is impossible for the feet to land under cog while running.

    There have been lengthy discussions on various sites about this and I’m sure you have seen them. It’s one thing to use this as a cue but you are suggesting that it actually happens when in reality it does not.

    • Dave Goulette
      February 17, 2012

      But Dave, it depends what you mean by “land.” You are correct if what you mean by “land” is the first place the foot “touches” the ground. It is true that the foot touches the ground in front of the center of gravity even in good running form. But Dan Lieberman and Mark Cucuzella have both addressed this issue and pointed out that the important point is where your foot is located when it is supporting the largest impact force. I think most people will understand what Jason means. I think he means the perceived “landing” that you feel which is the point where we feel max impact force. It is the point where shock absorption turns to recoil. This max force point should happen right under your center of gravity or just behind (if you have a bit of a lean). “Landing” and airplane is not at the point of first touchdown. It is when all the wheels have absorbed and normalized the downward forces and the plane is rolling.

      • Dave Goulette
        February 18, 2012

        Sorry, typo “Landing an airplane…”

      • Jason
        February 18, 2012

        Indeed. The goal is to teach people to run better using simple, easy to understand techniques, not bore people with an academic discussion about foot contact and weight distribution.

        ;-)

    • Dave Goulette
      February 18, 2012

      Watch this video for what I mean in my other comment. In it you will see the foot touch early but the force graph will not peak until the foot is much further into the mid-stance.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjrEyfQC5NQ&feature=player_embedded

  3. Aaron (aka Alejandro 10 @ BRS)
    February 16, 2012

    Thanks for thebarefootrunners.org love! One might be tempted to think you were co-founder or something.

    Gracia y paz,

    Aaron

    • Aaron (aka Alejandro 10 @ BRS)
      February 16, 2012

      I’m not into that graphic at 1:23 of the video. I understand that not everyone’s stride is the same, but I still don’t like that image.

    • Jason
      February 18, 2012

      ;-)

  4. EdH
    February 16, 2012

    I am just getting into it but I really enjoyed the run up to Santiago Peak. It is 12mi up, then you can either turn around and come back down, or take one of half a dozen different routes back down that vary in length (6-15mi or so) but you’ll have to get picked up since your car is in a different place. It could be a 40+ mile drive depending on where you wind up.

    Some is brutally technical, some is fire road, though it can be covered with fist-sized rocks they use to keep it from washing.

    If you really want a challenge, make sure Horse Thief Trail is in the mix. Up or down, that is a wicked 2+mile segment.

    • Jason
      February 18, 2012

      Thanks for the tip, Ed!

  5. chris
    February 16, 2012

    Good luck with the Whitney “run.” Beautiful. It will be tough going up, but fun on the way down! I did that round trip after Badwater a couple years ago…grueling hike up, then thunderstorms, and FAST run down. Middle of summer still had a few snow spots.

    -Chris

  6. Rob Y
    February 16, 2012

    Mt. Whitney in April??? Good luck with that, with the amount of snow and ice on there now it’ll be a tough go! July-August are typically the best times, but then you need to win the permit lottery (or get lucky with a day-of walk-in permit) and to contend with the crowds.

    Still so much snow in March-April-May in all the high Sierra fun places. Post hole city! If you can get a hold of some snow shoes I’d say have at it and have fun!

    • Jason
      February 16, 2012

      It will be very dependent on snow conditions. I’m crossing my fingers for little snowfall combined with a very early melt. We may hold off until early fall when we’ll be back in the state.

      • John White
        February 16, 2012

        This year there are abnormally low snow conditions in the Sierra. You have a better chance than any other year, but April is still pushing it. I’d reschedule that for May or June to have a realistic chance.

        Another fun run might be something that crosses the Sierra – perhaps running from Yosemite Valley up to Tioga Pass then down the Mono Lake? Certainly not an official route, but it fills your requirements nicely!

        • Jason
          February 18, 2012

          Thanks for the tip, John! I’m still working out the Whitney plans. Luckily we have a lot of alternatives based on our planned travels.

      • Rob Y
        February 16, 2012

        Still could be fun to head up into the Whitney Zone and explore. Maybe obtain some snow shoes or crampons? I’d love to go traverse around in the snow.

        I wanted to go up Mt. Whitney after Badwater last summer but the permit lottery gods did not favor me. Instead we went up to the top of Telescope Peak. Not an “extreme” hike but very, very rewarding. Panoramic views of all of Death Valley were simply breathtaking. Well worth it. April will still be cool enough in Death Valley; should go explore some of the back country trails there. Was too hot when we were there in July! :)